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Candle Making

as a hobby

Candle making is an art that combines science and magic. It is a way of transforming ordinary materials into extraordinary creations that can illuminate, inspire, and enchant.

Candle-making is a hobby that allows you to create your own candles using simple materials and methods. You can enjoy the benefits of candle making, such as relaxation, creativity, and satisfaction. You can also make candles for different purposes, such as decoration, gifts, or aromatherapy. To get started with candle-making, you can buy a candle-making kit or gather the basic supplies yourself.

Helpful content to start candle making as a hobby

We aim to provide accurate information, but errors might be found. Always exercise judgment and discretion.

Videos

Short visual inspiration.

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YouTube | Learn How to Make Scented Soy Wax Candles for Beginners | CandleScience Guides
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YouTube | FULL & easy beginners guide to Candle Making
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YouTube Playlist | Candle Making Tutorials, Projects, and Tips
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YouTube Playlist | CANDLE MAKING FOR BEGINNERS-Candle Making Basics 101

Podcasts

Play an episode while exploring the page.

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Spotify | Episode 1: Getting started on your Candlemaking journey.
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Spotify | Episode 2 – Why don’t my candles smell?
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Spotify | Ep004: The #1 misconception about making candles
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Spotify | Ep006: 5 mistakes every new candle maker makes
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Spotify | Ep022: Tips & tricks for candle makers
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Spotify | Ep054: 8 common candle making questions

Candle making can be a therapeutic and relaxing activity that can reduce stress and anxiety.

Terms

Basic lingo for orientation.

  • Additive: A substance added to the wax to change its properties, such as color, scent, hardness, or burning quality. Some common additives are candle dye, stearic acid, vybar, and UV inhibitor.
  • Burn Rate: The time it takes for the candle to completely run out of wax. This is usually calculated in grams of wax consumed per hour. The burn rate is used to determine the candle’s total burn time. The burn rate will vary depending on the type of wax, wick, fragrance, container and other factors.
  • Cure Time: The time it takes for the wax and fragrance to fully bond and reach their optimal scent throw. Cure time varies depending on the type of wax and fragrance used, but it is usually recommended to wait at least 24 hours before burning a candle.
  • Scent Throw: The strength of fragrance that a candle emits when it is cold (cold throw) or when it is burning (hot throw). Scent throw depends on many factors, such as the type and amount of fragrance, the type and size of wick, the type and size of container, and the ambient temperature and airflow.
  • Flashpoint: The temperature at which a fragrance oil or essential oil will ignite if exposed to an open flame or spark. Flashpoint is important to know when choosing a fragrance oil or essential oil for candle making, as it affects the safety and performance of the candle. Flashpoint also determines how a fragrance oil or essential oil should be stored and shipped.
  • Frosting: White crystalline structure that forms on the surface of natural waxes such as soy. Frosting is also known as bloom. It is caused by the natural contraction and expansion of wax during cooling and heating cycles. Frosting does not affect the quality or performance of the candle, but some people may find it aesthetically undesirable.
  • Wet Spots: Areas where the wax has pulled away from the glass container, creating an air gap that looks like a wet spot. Wet spots are also known as glass adhesion or delamination. They are caused by changes in temperature or humidity during cooling or storage. Wet spots do not affect the quality or performance of the candle, but some people may find them aesthetically undesirable.
  • Melt Point: The temperature at which melting wax gets hot enough to turn from a solid into a liquid. Melt point is important to know when choosing a wax for candle making, as it affects how the wax behaves in different containers and molds. Melt point also determines how a wax should be stored and shipped.
  • Melt Pool: The liquid layer of wax that forms as the candle burns. The melt pool should reach the edge of the container within 2 to 4 hours of burning, depending on the size of the container. This ensures that the candle burns evenly and efficiently, without leaving any unburned wax on the sides.
  • Mushrooming: When a candle consumes more wax than it can burn, black carbon residue begins to build up on the wick. This results in a mushroom-shaped ball at the end of the wick. Mushrooming is also known as carbon buildup. It may occur when you use a wick that is too large, or when you use too much fragrance or additives in your wax. Mushrooming can cause sooting, smoking, and reduced scent throw.
  • Wick: A strip of porous material up which liquid fuel is drawn by capillary action to the flame in a candle. The size and type of wick affect the burning performance and scent throw of the candle. Wicks can be made of different materials, such as cotton, paper, wood, or metal.

How to start candle making as a hobby

First moves for getting acquainted and breaking the ice.

Buy a candle-making starter kit with everything needed for your first projects.

If you need some immersive inspiration, visit a candle shop near you.

Books

Get read(y).

Candle making can be a sustainable and eco-friendly activity that can help you reduce waste and save money.

How-tos

Step-by-step tutorials.

Articles

Further reading.

Websites

Go-tos for information.

Candle making can be a creative and fun activity that allows you to express your personality and style.

Movies

Nothing like a film for inspiration.

FAQS

Get a clue.

What are the benefits of candle making as a hobby?

Candle-making can be a fun, creative, and relaxing activity that allows you to express your personality and style. You can also enjoy the satisfaction of making something with your own hands and the pleasure of giving or receiving candles as gifts. Candle making can also be a potential source of income if you decide to sell your candles online or at local markets.

What do I need to start candle making as a hobby?

The basic supplies you need to start a candle making are wax, wicks, containers or molds, fragrance and color (optional), and a heat source such as a double boiler or a microwave. You will also need some tools such as a thermometer, a scale, a stirring spoon, a pouring pitcher, and scissors. You can find these supplies at craft stores or online shops that specialize in candle making. A good way to start is to buy a candle-making kit with anything needed for your first projects.

What are the different types of wax for candle making?

There are many types of wax for candle making, each with its own properties and advantages. Some of the most common ones are paraffin wax, soy wax, beeswax, palm wax, rapeseed wax, and coconut wax.

How do I choose the right wick for my candle?

The right wick for your candle depends on several factors, such as the type and size of your container or mold, the type and amount of wax, the type and amount of fragrance and color, and the desired burn rate and flame height. As a general rule, you want to choose a wick that is large enough to create a full melt pool within 2 to 4 hours of burning, but not so large that it causes mushrooming, sooting, smoking, or tunneling. You may need to test different wicks to find the best one for your candle.

How do I add fragrance and color to my candle?

To add fragrance to your candle, you can use either fragrance oils or essential oils. Fragrance oils are synthetic oils that are specially designed for candle-making and offer a wide range of scents. Essential oils are natural oils that are extracted from plants and have aromatherapy benefits. However, not all essential oils are suitable for candle making, as some may have low flash points or poor scent throw. To add color to your candle, you can use either liquid dyes or dye chips. Liquid dyes are easy to use and allow you to create custom colors by mixing different shades. Dye chips are pre-measured blocks of color that you can simply add to your melted wax. You should always use dyes that are specifically made for candle making, as other types of dyes may not mix well with the wax or affect the burning quality of the candle.

Apps

Smart assistance.

Candle making can be a profitable and rewarding activity that can help you earn extra income or start your own business.

Products

Essentials to have.

Courses

Get smart.

Near You

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Candle making is one of the oldest crafts in human history.

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Tips

Additional advice for beginners.